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ENGN 4000 Research Session

Fun Stuff!

Background info and FREE Citation Management Software

Logging in from home

  • Need to use Passport York or bar code number & PIN from library card to authenticate as a York user
  • Information here on logging in
  • Remember: Use the library web page or this blog post for the link as it will prompt for login

General Information

  • Peer review: researchers validating each others work before publication
  • Kinds of documents:
    • patents: government granted license to an invention
    • standards: agreed upon methodology: ie 802.11
    • journals: research results presented in a periodical/magazine. Peer reviewed.
    • trade literature: discipline-specific magazines. Not Peer Reviewed.
    • conference proceedings: research results presented at a meeting. Often peer reviewed, but not always.
    • technical report: description of a solution to a specific problem. Not peer reviewed.
    • books
      • reference: encyclopedias, tables, data collections, properties
      • manuals: lab methods, programming languages, operating systems
      • monographs: general topics
    • technical specifications: how a device or component works, ie circuit diagrams
  • If you’re not sure how to get started on your project, come to Steacie.

 

  • My Topic: Let’s compete with Google on intelligent vehicles!
  • Plan B: ground penetrating radar for Mars mission…or for finding landmines
  • It’s ok to check Wikipedia to help formulate search strategies!

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ENGN 1000 Engineering Design Research Session

FUN STUFF!

FREE Citation Management Software

  • For off campus use, get the York group code here.
  • Key points:
    • Don’t forget to install Write-n-Cite on your PC.  It’s in the Tools menu
    • Also don’t forget to move items out of the “Last Imported” folder into the folder you create for your course

 

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ENGN / ENG 3310 Space Mission Design Research Session

Background info and FREE Citation Management Software

  • For books and reports that York Libraries don’t have:

General Information

  • Peer review: researchers validating each others work before publication
  • Kinds of documents:
    • patents: government granted license to an invention
    • standards: agreed upon methodology: ie 802.11
    • journals: research results presented in a periodical/magazine. Peer reviewed.
    • trade literature: discipline-specific magazines. Not Peer Reviewed.
    • conference proceedings: research results presented at a meeting. Often peer reviewed, but not always.
    • technical report: description of a solution to a specific problem. Not peer reviewed.
    • books
      • reference: encyclopedias, tables, data collections, properties
      • manuals: lab methods, programming languages, operating systems
      • monographs: general topics
    • technical specifications: how a device or component works, ie circuit diagrams
  • If you’re not sure how to get started on your project, come to Steacie.
  • My Topic: Pick one from last year.

Continue reading


Space and beyond: Science Rendezvous at York

Tons of space and science related events at the upcoming Science Rendezvous event at the Keele campus It’s Saturday, May 10th. Lots of info in today’s Y-File article.

York University will throw open the doors of its space science and engineering facilities to hundreds of future astronauts on Saturday, May 10. York is participating in Science Rendezvous, a new full day event that is free and open to the public. During Science Rendezvous, leading science and technology institutes, including York, will offer free tours, events, demonstrations and lectures. Participants can register for the day and pick up a program in the lobby of the Computer Science & Engineering Building. Registration opens at 12:30pm.

“York University’s event will be very unique,” says Elissa Strome, research officer for the Faculty of Science & Engineering. “We are opening the doors to our world-renowned space science and engineering facilites to showcase them to Canada’s future astronauts and space scientists.”

York-specific information here.


Is Dextre the last hurrah?

…for the Canadian Space Program, that is.

At least that’s the thrust of a recent article in the National Post.

Some background:

But even as Canada celebrates another milestone in its nearly 50-year history of involvement in space, some critics are wondering: Will it be the last?

The shuttle Endeavour will carry the Canadian-built Dextre module — the nickname given to the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator, the “hand” for the massive Canadarm2 robotic arm — to the International Space tation, the last component in Canada’s contribution to the 16-nation project.

The arm, an 18-metre-long, remotely controlled and highly complex construction crane, was installed in 2001 while the Mobile Base System, the “shoulder” for the Canadarm, was brought up to the space station in 2002.

York Space Engineering prof. Brendan Quine is quoted:

Ben Quine, a professor at York University’s Earth and Space Engineering department, said the sudden departure of the former president was cause for concern. “That was somewhat alarming. He had only really been in the job for a few months and it came as a surprise when he left … It was not a good sign.”

Prof. Quine says Dextre’s arrival in orbit may well mark the beginning of a new era in Canada’s role in space exploration, but it is not yet clear what that role will be.

“Canadarm was a great Canadian success story,” he says. “But to some extent, we’ve lost our way in the space industry in this country … I think we’ve got to be really careful about our direction in the future. We need a viable space industry and a vibrant research and development sector.”

*snip*

“Governments don’t typically have much interest in a big space program in Canada,” he says. “But this is an export market that generates wealth in our economy … [and] it’s a high-tech industry.”

Prof. Quine says space and related industries worldwide are worth about $200-billion a year, and that Canada’s share of that business — about $2-billion a year — could dry up without a greater commitment from Ottawa to support it. “If we don’t support our industry, we risk losing our share of that market,” he says. “And it’s a market that’s going to get extremely competitive in the next few years with India and China moving into space.

“We really have to articulate more clearly to governments why it’s important for Canada to fund space exploration … We need to tell our political leaders about the huge benefits space can bring Canada.”

You tell ‘em, Ben!


Women in Computer Science & Engineering

Since it’s International Women’s Day, I thought I’d point out a nice article in Y-File profiling York’s Women in Computer Science & Engineering program.

York computer science Professor Eshrat Arjomandi can remember a time when she was one of only a handful of women studying computer science at university. It was a lonely road, filled with challenging and grueling course work, hours of study and the isolation that comes from being a female in a male-dominated profession. It was with this experience in mind that Arjomandi, together with colleagues in York’s Faculty of Science & Engineering, formed a small ad-hoc group in 2004 with a mission to support and mentor a growing number of young women choosing to study computer science and engineering at York.

It’s a great article about some great women doing some really important work. Here’s a nice photo of some of the students (Anna Topol, Foroohar Foroozan, Mary Kuruvilla and Neha Durwas) along with Profs. Melanie Baljko, Eshrat Arjomandi and Natalija Vlajic. (And don’t forget Prof. Baljko’s daughter Erma).
WiCSE

Also of interest, the Steacie Spotlight this month is books on Women in Science. We have highlighted over 30 books on that theme, ranging from Grace Hopper to Lise Meitner and women astronauts and everything in between. Check it out (and check out the books too) on the Steacie New Books shelves.


Prof. Vincent Tao on the launch of MS Live Maps in China

York Geomatics prof Vincent Tao has an interview up on one of my favourite technology/commentary blogs, O’Reilly Radar.

Can you tell us about coverage? What exactly launched today? What’s the difference in the platform between VE China and VE everywhere else?

The China release demonstrates our success in deploying our first VE data center remotely. We now have an in-country data center offering the better system performance and greater user experiences. This distributed mapping architecture allows us to grow the international markets in a scalable way. In this first release, VE China covers both tier-1 and tier-2 total 114 cities with very rich local contents (millions of POI/YP). In addition to most VE features in USA, China release offers the public transit feature for bus and train commuters. We understand that this is the most demanding feature for China users when concerning maps. We cannot afford not having this feature even for v1 release


Prof Amir Asif: Reaching out to industry

In the December 2007 issue of YorkU Magazine there’s and article about York faculty reaching out and making connections (on page 26). This article profiles Prof. Asif’s work on designing better cancer treatments using signals from a tiny homing beacon to focus radiation treatments on a specific part of the body. He is collaborating on this project with IBM and sanofi pasteur.

According to Stan Shapson, York VP Research and Innovation:

Governments do a lot of investment in basic reserach, which is critically important in the long term. But government also want to look at opportunities for earlier returns on investment. That’s why it’s important for a university to take applied research and, in some cases, graduate training and experience out into the local community.”

Great article.  Check it out.


Prof. Quine in the news again!

From Y-File:

Instead of counting on polluters to report their own emissions, York space scientist Brendan Quine has developed a sneaky pollution spy – a tiny gadget that works in space, reported The Globe and Mail Nov. 3. Called the Argus microspectrometer, it picks up on the chemical signatures of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that cause global warming. It will launch into orbit next month on board a microsatellite test-driving tiny instruments. Most tools sent into space cost millions and wind up as nothing more than pollution themselves: giant pieces of obsolete trash orbiting the Earth. Argus costs about $75,000 and can fit in the palm of your hand – making it a cost-effective example of sustainable space instrumentation.


And speaking of Space…

Last week’s New York Times science section was entirely devoted to the 50th anniversary of the Sputnik launch. The section was called The Space Age and it has a lot of very interesting articles:

BTW, the Tuesday New York Times always has a full section devoted to science; it’s well worth checking out. All the articles are available on their web site.