posters

  • Date: Thursday, June 5
  • Time: 16:20-17:40
  • Chair: Samantha Guss
  • Location: Cara Commons, TRSM (map)


Aila and Metka – FSD’s new tools for the trade

  • Presenter(s): Matti Heinonen, Finnish Social Science Data Archive FSD; Tuomas J. Alatera, Finnish Social Science Data Archive FSD
  • Abstract: This poster introduces Aila and Metka, two brand new tools for the Finnish Social Science Data Archive (FSD). Aila is FSD’s new web based customer service portal. It will be our main tool for data dissemination. Aila allows customers to search, browse and review our data descriptions on study and variable level, and after registration, download data directly from the service portal. We will demonstrate the functionality of the portal and share the experiences gained during the building phase and the first few months of operation. Metka will be FSD’s tool for managing metadata. Metadata will be entered to Metka, which in turn will feed other systems at FSD (e.g., Aila). This will greatly simplify building services based on our rich metadata as it allows repurposing metadata from a single authorative source. We will present Metka’s features and show how it connects to FSD’s services and other systems. The system will be operational in January 2015. Metka is open source and can be obtained from github. With Aila and Metka, we have defined the software platform FSD will utilise in building new tools for the archive and services for our customers. For example, Shibboleth will be used consistently for user authentication.

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Training for an Infrastructure: The CESSDA Training Centre

  • Presenter(s): Alexia Katsanidou, Gesis – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences; Astrid Recker, Jessica Trixa, Dafina Kurti
  • Abstract: The CESSDA Centre has the mission to create a virtual place where archivists, researchers and students of the wide field of social science and humanities data can find training, advice and educational resources. The Center has academic and service excellence on three subjects: Research Data Management, Data Discovery, and Digital Preservation. This thematic structure also allows us to expend to other societal stakeholders interested in data, such as NGO’s, journalists, government organizations, and the general public. The challenge of the training centre is not only to provide adequate services to the designated user communities but also to act as a connecting link between all experts and centres of excellence within the CESSDA infrastructure community. The establishment of collaborations with experts interested in training will allow the maximum flow of information and the constant improvement of quality of training. The target is to make the Centre into a reference point of infrastructure training for experts and users. Activities include coordination and centralized publicising of events, common training and online materials, as well as common research and publicising of activities, so that information reaches all relevant audiences.

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All [global] data is local: how academic libraries are enabling discovery and access for institutional data collections

  • Presenter(s): Terrence Bennett, The College of New Jersey; Shawn W. Nicholson, Michigan State University
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Bennett.pdf
  • Abstract: This poster will report on a methodical analysis of the role and function of academic libraries in support of the global data ecosystem. Specifically, we’ll examine how academic libraries (particularly at large research universities in North America and the UK, where data curation and research data services are functions that have become embedded into the research infrastructure) are enabling cross-institutional and interdisciplinary discovery and use of locally produced research data collections. The analysis will also consider how (or if) academic libraries are positioning their local holdings–particularly digital texts, image files, audio archives, and other non-numeric collections–as research datasets (rather than as artifacts of limited local and/or historical interest); and, more importantly, how libraries are making these datasets discoverable by researchers.

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The UK Administrative Data Research Network

  • Presenter(s): Tanvi Desai, University of Essex; Melanie Wright; John Sanderson
  • Presentation:
  • Abstract: This poster presents an overview of the new Administrative Data Research Network being established in the UK. The Network aims to build a world-leading infrastructure for enabling research access to data which is routinely collected by UK and devolved government departments and agencies. The Network highlights the importance of linked administrative data in answering key policy-relevant research questions, and aims to provide a streamlined and coherent pathway through the disparate and difficult requirements for research access to these kinds of resources — everything from data negotiation to ethical and governance review to data security requirements, secure data analysis facilities and statistical disclosure control. The poster will highlight the network brand and upcoming website launch and present our continuing development plans.

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Working across boundaries: public and private domains

  • Presenter(s): Flavio Bonifacio, Metis Ricerche
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Bonifacio.pdf
  • Abstract: This paper will illustrate some problems arising when building the necessary infrastructure for data preservation and data reuse across the public and private domains. We are now building, as a private initiative, a new Nesstar based archive in order to preserve data collection of public and private research centers. For this purpose the old separation between Academic and Normal world creates troubles and appears to be anachronistic and obsolete. Especially if we work in the context of the global data ecosystem.

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DataONE Toolkit for Librarians

  • Presenter(s): Stephanie Wright, University of Washington; Carly Strasser, California Digital Library; Gail Steinhart, Cornell University
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Wright.pdf
  • Abstract: As part of the DataONE Community Engagement Working Group, we have created an Outreach Toolkit for Librarians that pulls together information about DataONE, resources on data management and preservation, and builds community around the DataONE effort to encourage long-term data access and preservation. DataONE (funded by the National Science Foundation) is focused on federating existing data repositories in the earth and environmental sciences. The infrastructure being built is complemented by educational and outreach activities which inform the community about data stewardship. This Toolkit introduces librarians to DataONE and resources and tools they can use to fill a relevant and timely need for their communities, framed in the context of the data lifecycle. Resources include a database and instructional materials on best practices for data management, a software tools catalog, a research data management needs survey and assessment bibliography, and more. By participating in data management education, librarians extend their mission of service and preservation for the academic community and promote best practices in data management to accomplish the aims of sharing, providing access to, and preserving data as effectively as possible. We also include in the toolkit information on how libraries and librarians can get involved with the DataONE community.

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A National Agenda for Digital Stewardship

  • Presenter(s): Jonathan Crabtree, Odum Institute UNC Chapel Hill; United States of America, Library of Congress, NDSA
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Crabtree.pdf
  • Abstract: The vast amount of research data generated across the globe demands a collaborative approach to digital curation and research data infrastructures. The social science community has enormous knowledge to share in this field. At the same time, we have dynamic needs that stretch our resources. A powerful approach is to exchange knowledge and practices with other data curation and preservation professionals in a joint effort improve our results. The National Agenda for Digital Stewardship, produced by the NDSA, annually integrates the perspective of dozens of experts and hundreds of institutions, convened through the Library of Congress, to identify the highest-impact opportunities to advance the state of the art; the state of practice; and the state of collaboration within the next 3-5 years. The poster highlights emerging technological trends, identifies gaps in digital stewardship capacity and provides funders and decision-makers with insight into the work needed to ensure that today’s valuable digital content remains accessible and comprehensible in the future, supporting a thriving economy, a robust democracy, and a rich cultural heritage. Founded in 2010, the National Digital Stewardship Alliance (NDSA) is a consortium of more than 160 organizations that are committed to the long-term preservation of digital information.

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CRADLE: Curating Research Assets and Data Using Lifecycle Education

  • Presenter(s): Thu-Mai Christian, Odum Institute UNC Chapel Hill
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Christian.pdf
  • Abstract: The proposed poster will highlight the Curating Research Assets and Data Using Lifecycle Education (CRADLE) Project. An IMLS-funded project, CRADLE will produce high-quality massive open online courses (MOOCs) and face-to-face workshops focused on data management best practice for researchers and information professionals sought after to support those researchers. These products will be placed at the center of a greater initiative to establish networks of data management education and practice. For the CRADLE project to be sustainable, the MOOC and other materials will serve as a nexus point from which such networks will emerge. These networks are indispensable for aligning efforts to promote standards of practice and to shift the culture towards one that recognizes research data as valued assets critical to the research enterprise.

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Forging a Community: Current developments in MTNA’s OpenDataForge suite of applications

  • Presenter(s): Andrew DeCarlo, Metadata Technology North America
  • Abstract: Statistical data exist in many different shapes and forms such as proprietary software files (SAS, Stata, SPSS), ASCII text (fixed, CSV, delimited), databases (Microsoft, Oracle, MySql), or spreadsheets (Excel). Such a wide variety of formats presents producers, archivists, analysts, and other users with significant challenges in terms of data usability, preservation, or dissemination. These files also commonly contain essential information, like the data dictionary, that can be extracted and leveraged for documentation purposes, task automation, or further processing. In 2013 Metadata Technology launched their new software utility suite, “OpenDataForge”, for facilitating the reading/writing of data across packages, producing various flavors of DDI metadata, and performing other useful operations around statistical datasets, to support data management, dissemination, or analysis activities. Metadata Technology has continued to revise and expand the OpenDataForge product suite based on user feedback and new technologies. This presentation will focus on OpenDataForge and the updates, new products, and future products that are being developed in 2014.

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Spatially Speaking: Mapping Discourse between Disciplines at the University of Southern California

  • Presenter(s): Andrzej Rutkowski, University of Southern California
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Rutkowski.pdf
  • Abstract: This poster will illustrate the development and results of a research salon focused on fostering a dialogue between students, faculty, and the USC libraries around GIS/Spatial research. Beyond providing the traditional tools, services, and resources for scholars to do research, I want to explore how the library can help facilitate new models of knowledge exchange. This salon is a prototype for how public discourse may help promote the research process, especially in an emerging discipline where infrastructure is sometimes difficult to create and demands for new data are ever present. The poster will show all the steps taken to create the event, from conceptualization to lessons learned. It should be of interest to anyone who is seeking out ways to connect students and faculty to resources in emerging disciplines, especially those that are GIS/spatially oriented. The poster will try to highlight how connections are made across different disciplines and identify new ways of building a fluid and active research infrastructure that allows for traditional and new forms of data research to emerge.

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The American National Election Studies at 65: Looking Back and Moving Forward

  • Presenter(s): Darrell Donakowski, American National Election Studies; Pat Luevano; Jaime Ventura; Laurie Pierson
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Donakowski.pdf
  • Abstract: In 1948, under the direction of Angus Campbell and Robert Kahn, the Survey Research Center (SRC) at the University of Michigan, carried out what it viewed as a pilot study of the national electorate. 1948 provided the trial for the method and 1952 took that trial, embedded contending theoretical frameworks in the study and fine-tuned measurement. Those studies, 65 years ago, were the beginning of what is now known as the American National Election Study (ANES). This poster session will provide information on the history of the ANES, the advances in the understanding of politics due to the study, and the innovations that have come from the study. It will also present information on the difficulties that arise in conducting a longitudinal study of this nature and provide insight on how the ANES has worked to adapt to the constantly changing world of research in the social sciences.

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Global popularization of e-Repositories in the marine information environment: structure, goals, opportunities

  • Presenter(s): Kateryna Kulakova, YugNIRO
  • Abstract: Up-to-date trends in marine information management, accomplished within the institute specialized in fisheries and oceanographic research, are studied. Possibility to take part in various international projects, which enable more digital output from the institution to be globally accessible and, vice versa, more external data to be fully retrieved, is considered. YugNIRO activities within the ASFA National Partnership are presented in relation to the FAO Secretariat recent requirements on record submission with regard to full text access and timeliness. YugNIRO achievements within the CEEMaR e-Repository are shown as the initiative for storage, conservation and global access of the institute’s born-digital and made-digital collections.

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Architecture of the European Remote Access Network (Eu-RAN)

  • Presenter(s): David Schiller, Insitute for Employment Research (IAB); Anja Burghardt
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Schiller.pdf
  • Abstract: The European Data without Boundaries (DwB) project proposes a Remote Access Network (Eu-RAN) to bring together researchers and research projects with confidential microdata from different European sources. At the IASSIST in Washington, 2012, first ideas of the Eu-RAN concept were presented. In 2014 a more detailed description of the Eu-RAN architecture can be given. Separated running European Remote Access solutions could be improved by connecting them into a Network. A centralized Single Point of Access (SPA) will make it easier to reach several decentralized organized network points and ease the work of researchers running projects with data from different data owners within this Network. A central service hub within Eu-RAN will host different tools that support researchers and research projects. One of the attached services is a Microdata Computation Centre. Additional services are: a virtual research environments, user account and contract management, interfaces to research data access, text editors, statistical software packages, and tools for cooperation like forums, wikis or instant messaging. This poster shows the architecture of the Eu-RAN. This infrastructure will improve access to confidential microdata by mastering the trade-off between researchers needs and data security; in addition it will lead to legal and organizational harmonization.

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Designing multi-modal questionnaires in real time

  • Presenter(s): Samuel Spencer, Open Source Developer / Freelance researcher
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Spencer.zip
  • Abstract: A combined demonstration and poster session outlining the advantages of the Canard Question Module Editor & the Simple Questionnaire Building Language. The Canard Question Module Editor is a free, open source questionnaire design tool, that allows for the drag and drop creation of rich questionnaires. Using the domain-specific and minimal Simple Questionnaire Building Language [http://sqbl.org] as its target language, Canard is able to support the transformation to numerous formats using XSLT that allows for custom import and export transformations. The minimal language and adherence to the principles of Structured Questionnaire Design, mean that routing is predictable and could be transformed into any format, as well as supporting real-time updates to questionnaires during creation to provide designers with functional example questionnaires and routing diagrams as they edit content. Demonstrations will include: * Import/export functionality to supporting standards including DDI Codebook and Lifecycle, CS-Pro, HTML and PDF. * Design of multilingual content supporting any number of languages, and checking for gaps in translations. * Live previewing of surveys including complex routing and filtering. * Drag-and-drop creation of routing logic, word substitutions and derived data elements. * Automatic creation of questionnaire metadata, including the creation of flowcharts illustrating respondent routing.

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DDI Transformation via XSLT

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openICPSR: Public Access Data Sharing at ICPSR

  • Presenter(s): Linda Detterman, ICPSR – University of Michigan
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Detterman.pdf
  • Abstract: There exists a growing desire, and growing requirements for scientific research data collected by federal funds to be shared publicly and without charge. Agencies such as the NSF and NIH require data management plans as part of research proposals and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is requiring federal agencies to develop plans to increase public access to results of federally funded scientific research. To be effectively shared, data must be described and documented, discoverable online, and accessible, both today and into the future. Data must be curated. Data curation requires data sharing entities are sustainable. Sustainability requires funding. In early 2014, ICPSR launched a fee-for-deposit service that provides free access to data and documentation to the public and is sustained by deposit fees. openICPSR is a research data-sharing service for the social and behavioral sciences. openICPSR data are: widely and immediately accessible at no cost to data users, safely stored by a trusted repository dedicated to long-term data stewardship, and protected against confidentiality and privacy concerns. This session will demonstrate the openICPSR system and discuss how researchers can take advantage of this new means of archiving data to comply with federal data sharing and preservation standards.

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Are Canadian Universities RDM-ready?

  • Presenter(s): Sylvie Lafortune, Carleton University; Cesar Villamizar
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Lafortune.pdf
  • Abstract: As Canadian agencies prepare to enact a joint policy on the management of data collected through agency funds, universities must ensure they have the human and technical resources in place to support their researchers in meeting agency requirements for data deposit. This exploratory research attempts to describe the range of RDM services currently offered in selected Canadian universities. Beyond conducting a review of what is available, the purpose of this study is to provide more insight on the required building blocks, including the collaborative models, needed to create a sustainable research data management service. The poster presents the methodology, study framework and results.

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Data management in the liberal arts: Current practices and attitudes at a Big 10 American University

  • Presenter(s): Alicia Hofelich Mohr, University of Minnesota; Thomas Lindsay
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_HofelichMohr.pdf
  • Abstract: The diverse nature of liberal arts research makes identifying needs and providing support for data management a complex task. Attesting to this diversity, in our survey of 29 departments at Minnesota, we found differing practices, attitudes, and awareness about managing data and research materials. Many respondents identified need for data management support across the research lifecycle, with the largest needs for data security, preservation, and sharing. However, there are striking differences across the social sciences, arts, and humanities in attitudes and perceptions towards data management and what it entails, perhaps due to differing requirements and cultures in the fields. These demonstrate that a one-size-fits-all approach to support data management is not appropriate for a broadly diverse liberal arts college; rather, the services we develop should be sensitive to discipline-specific needs. To further explore these possibilities, we plan to administer our survey to other colleges within the University. As Minnesota is one of the few Big 10 Universities to institutionally separate the liberal arts from sciences, comparing our results with other more disciplinary-specific colleges should allow us to evaluate the roles institutional organization and disciplinary expectations may play in the emergence of data management needs and support.

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Colectica for Excel: A Free Tool for Increasing Data Accessibility using Open Standards

  • Presenter(s): Jeremy Iverson, Colectica; Jeremy Iverson, Colectica; Dan Smith, Colectica
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Iverson.pdf
  • Abstract: Traditionally, data in spreadsheets and plain text formats do not contain rich documentation. Often, single-word column headers are the only hint given to data users, making it difficult to make sense of the data. Colectica for Microsoft Excel is a free tool to document your spreadsheet data using DDI, the open standard for data documentation. With this Excel addin, users can add extensive information about each column of data. Variables, Code Lists, and the datasets can be globally identified and described in a standard format. This documentation is embedded with the spreadsheet, ensuring the information is available when data are shared. The addin also adds support for SPSS and Stata formats to Excel. When opening an SPSS or Stata file in Excel, standard metadata is automatically created from the variable and value labels. Colectica for Excel can create print-ready reports based on the data documentation. The information can also be exported to the DDI standard, which can be ingested into other standards-based tools. This booth will include live demonstrations of the latest version of the Colectica for Excel tool, showing how to document the contents of a spreadsheet, publish the information, and use the documentation to access data in an informed way.

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A Data Librarian’s Dream Come True: Data Access Made Effortless

  • Presenter(s): Jane Fry, Carleton University; Alexandra Cooper, Queen’s University Library
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Fry.zip
  • Abstract: A collaborative effort among the Ontario data community created ODESI (Ontario Data Documentation, Extraction Service and Infrastructure), a data portal. This revolutionary process of obtaining data has transformed data access for researchers, empowering them by providing ready access to this vital data library service. This poster illustrates the cumbersome process that was necessary to obtain data 15 years ago and compares it with the quick, innovative way it is obtained today, thus freeing up the Data Librarian’s time to educate the researcher in the intricacies of data literacy.

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Bringing data to the DANCE: implementing a data acquisition model at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

  • Presenter(s): Jim Obst, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Obst.pdf
  • Abstract: In August of 2011, Federal Reserve’s librarians were asked to come together to manage purchased data acquisitions. The new initiative required one librarian from each of the 12 Reserve Banks and one from the Board of Governors to implement a common process for data procurement. It also formalized the use of a common data catalog. The overall goal was to avoid unnecessary duplication and leverage purchasing power as whole. In response to the mandate, the managing librarians of the Federal Reserve System formed a new, collaborative data work group made up of their 13 chosen data librarians. Together the group created and implemented innovative system-wide policies and workflows, including a unique online catalog. Each individual data librarian was in turn responsible for initiating new policies and workflows for the data management process within their own Reserve Bank. In the Chicago Fed, implementation of the new data acquisition regime has been successful, with variations on its implementation like a District Data Management Group and educational initiatives about data use and procurement protocols. In the first two years, the need for collaborative tools have given way to workflows in SharePoint. Other solutions are planned.

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Data Seal of Approval

  • Presenter(s): Mary Vardigan, University of Michigan, ICPSR
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Vargidan.pdf
  • Abstract: The Data Seal of Approval (DSA) provides a mechanism for repositories to demonstrate their trustworthiness in a transparent way. The assessment criteria are made up of 16 guidelines for which repositories supply evidence of compliance. Once the self-assessment is complete, a peer reviewer evaluates the evidence, and if the repository is found to be in compliance with the 16 guidelines, the Data Seal of Approval is awarded with the seal displayed on the repository’s Web site. Twenty-four repositories have received the DSA so far with more in the pipeline. This poster will provide more information about the DSA initiative to encourage new DSA applicants.

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Data Documentation and Metadata use in Research Data Management

  • Presenter(s): Christie Wiley, University of Illinois
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Wiley.pdf
  • Abstract: The role of librarian and research data management has been a growing topic of discussion and participation within libraries and universities. Librarians and universities have formed many initiatives, committees and groups to assist in the areas of support for data deposit and data management. The University of Illinois created an e-research implementation group to bring together subject specialists, research data librarians, and functional specialists to advance the library’s data initiatives. In order to support the efforts of a broader goal to educate others about the research data services that are available to them and offer tools to meet their data needs, a smaller group of librarians within the e-research implementation group began a project to update the data services website. This update provided information and education regarding the definition of data, intellectual property, data sharing, funding requirements, files, formats, preservation and storage information. This poster illustrates how a website can be used as an instructional model for data documentation and metadata. The goal of this poster is to provide insight and information as a point of reference when librarians, researchers, data managers, curators and scientists meet individuals with data needs.

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From curation to publication of DDI-L metadata

  • Presenter(s): Jannik Jensen, Danish National Archive
  • Abstract: The DDA DdiEditor was developed as a generic suite of tools to produce DDI-Lifecycle metadata for survey data sets. The DdiEditor supports curation of variables, questions, codes, categories, instrumentation, universes and concepts as well as linkage of these meta elements. The DdiEditor has been supplemented by an indexing platform allowing the user to search (simple or advanced) in study description questions, variables, categories, universes and/or concepts. The study level description is publish as landing pages allowing the user interactively to move from one study description to another by clicking on a metadata element e.g. a keyword. Similarly the traditional codebook presenting questions, variables, universes, concepts and instrumentation has be enriched by interactivity and graphics for descriptive statistics for all variables. All metadata are published in a DDI-L XML format ready to import for external search engines and other services. Every study is given an persistent identifier in form of a DOI (digital object identifier). We would like to invite more organisations (that is other than DDA;) to try out the DdiEditor and indexing platform as a tool for producing and disseminating DDI-L metadata.

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Deepening collaborative relationships in providing Research Data Management support

  • Presenter(s): Carol Perry, University of Guelph; Wayne Johnston, University of Guelph
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Perry.pdf
  • Abstract: This poster will trace new patterns of collaboration in establishing programs for research data management in a Canadian context. The University of Guelph Library Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communications team has broadened its relationships with other campus units as well as other institutions to strengthen training program development for graduate students and faculty. Our work includes partnership in a multi-university team creating training modules for graduate students in Ontario. We have worked with a provincial government ministry to create a data repository for agri-environmental research and are working with a non-profit group assisting in the development of a discipline-specific repository. These are just a few examples of initiatives we have undertaken over the past year.

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Developing incentives for data stewardship and sharing: Library engagement beyond liaison relationships

  • Presenter(s): Heather Coates, IUPUI; Ted Polley
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Coates.pdf
  • Abstract: Many of the obstacles slowing the adoption of more democratic dissemination of scholarly products are cultural, not technological. While libraries have extended their technological capacity to new methods of dissemination, we have been less proactive in fostering the cultural change necessary for significant adoption. Two particular groups of constituents and communities of practice have been engaged with the library profession, but the personal contact between faculty and librarians at the institutional level is inconsistent and often hinges upon liaison relationships. This poster will describe opportunities for librarians to engage with institutional units and research communities extending beyond institutional boundaries to advance incentives rewarding new forms of dissemination, including data as a valued community resource. Examples of relating changes in dissemination to various community missions will be provided.

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Your IASSIST Today!

  • Presenter(s): Hailey Mooney, Michigan State University; Paula Lackie, Carleton College
  • Abstract: Stop by this poster to speak with members of the IASSIST Administrative Committee. Learn about and create opportunities for professional development through involvement. Share your professional needs with us and help shape IASSIST for your needs!

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IASSIST 2015 Minneapolis

  • Presenter(s): Thomas Lindsay, IASSIST Treasurer
  • Abstract: The 41st annual conference of IASSIST will be June 2-5, 2015 in Minneapolis, MN, USA, hosted by the Minnesota Population Center at the University of Minnesota. Find out about all that the City of Lakes and the Twin Cities region have to offer at our conference presentation poster.

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Defining security requirements for a remote access system

  • Presenter(s): Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda, GESIS – Leibniz-Institute for the Social Sciences; Co-authors: Andreas Poller, Philipp Holzinger, Laura Kocksch, Stefan Triller, Sven Türpe
  • Presentation: 2014_Poster_Kinder.pdf
  • Abstract: This paper presents some first results of the one-year project "Empirical Secure Software Engineering (ESSE)" which had the two aims (1) to define security requirements for a planned Secure Data Center remote access at GESIS in Germany and (2) to evaluate different threat modelling techniques. Such techniques are intended to assist software developers in defining and evaluating security risks for a system and in deducing necessary requirements for design, implementation and operation. Using several different modelling techniques a group of participating GESIS staff from various archiving and IT backgrounds generated a collection of threat models. We then interviewed participants about their viewpoints, aggregated the models and discussed them in a group session. Through this process we defined security requirements and translated them into implementable technical and organizational security recommendations. Our approach also enabled us to evaluate the applied techniques’ strengths and weaknesses. We will explain some of the security requirements we defined and also show how our process allowed us to make visible different stakeholders’ viewpoints, was able to support meaningful discussion, and facilitated decision making. Our process can be useful for other archives looking for ways to define security requirements in the fields of archiving and data sharing.

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Variable Shopping Basket Architecture: A Hybrid Approach for CNSS 2.0

  • Presenter(s): Jeremy Williams, Cornell University; Florio Arguillas, Cornell University
  • Abstract: The Cornell National Social Survey (CNSS), an annual survey conducted by the Survey Research Institute (SRI), is now on its 6th wave. As the designated repository of CNSS datasets, the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (CISER) is responsible for creating, curating, and subjecting to disclosure avoidance techniques the public use and integrated versions of this series. In addition, CISER provides the mechanism for finding, discovering, and disseminating the series complete with a variable shopping basket that allows users to select and download only the variables that they need. In late 2013, CISER decided to update its variable shopping basket architecture to improve user experience and delivery of the collection. In this paper we describe in detail our updated infrastructure for the Cornell National Social Survey search, discovery, and download tool. At the backend we employ an XML repository housing DDI 3 XML files to deliver metadata contents to users and a relational database to deliver the data itself. Both the XML repository and Relational database can be queried using XQuery and SQL, respectively, through a CNSS API that we developed so it can be accessed from other computing devices.

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