Digital Scholarship

York University Libraries support programs in the interest of promoting and furthering digital scholarship at York University and beyond.

The libraries are in the midst of a year-long, system-wide restructuring initiative which will take place over 2017. Restructuring discussions will have a direct impact on how we support digital scholarship. Accordingly, we are unable to take on new digital projects as our focus will be on an examination and realignment of our offerings. We are, however, continuing to support digital scholarship on campus by maintaining existing projects and offering our expert consultation services.

Areas of activity include:

Digital Scholarship Events

University Librarian’s Speaker Series on Emergent Research in Digital Scholarship

Capturing the Web Today for Tomorrow: Innovations in capturing and analyzing social media and websites for the new scholarly record
On behalf of York University Libraries, Joy Kirchner was delighted to welcome Ian Milligan (Assistant Professor, History) from the University of Waterloo and Nick Ruest (Digital Assets Librarian) from York University to give the inaugural talk for the University Librarian’s Speaker Series on Emergent Research in Digital Scholarship. Milligan and Ruest discussed innovations in the web archiving collections and research methods. In their presentation “Capturing the Web Today for Tomorrow: Innovations in capturing and analyzing social media and websites for the new scholarly record” Ian and Nick highlighted work from their Web Archives for Longitudinal Knowledge project.

Library Futures Speaker Series

Research Data Management in the Canadian Context, Eh?
York University Libraries, in partnership with the Office of the Vice President, Research and Innovation, warmly welcomed Mark Leggott, ExecutiveMark Leggott Director of Research Data Canada as part of its Library Futures Speaker Series. Mark addressed our roles and responsibilities as individual researchers and as a broader organization with respect to data borne of the research lifecycle. In his talk Research Data Management in the Canadian Context, Eh? Mark drew on lessons learned from the EU context and discussed how we might adopt best practices in the Canadian context.

Areas of activity include: